Tactile Paving

“Tactile paving (also called truncated domes, detectable warnings, Tactile Ground Surface Indicators, detectable warning surfaces) is a system of textured ground surface indicators found on many footpaths, stairs and train station platforms to assist blind and vision impaired pedestrians.” – Wiki

My first and second week in London was full of commuting. Every day. For various business-and-not-only reasons.

Nothing wrong with this, but something happened that really made my life harder. I was rushing to catch the District Line train in Earl’s Court, so I jumped from the Piccadilly Line train and my foot landed on these things they have so that blind people have an easier life in society.

If you didn’t understand yet what I am talking about, see image below:

Those spikes are like bullets if you step on hard.
Those spikes are like bullets if you step on hard.

You have to be extremely careful with these things, I had leg pain and I was crippling for a week and a half. I realized that this tactile texture was the root of my pain when I did it again and I almost folded in two by the pain.

The worst pain is given by these pavements: The fact that are nearly invisible makes the situation worse.

These are like 7.62mm bullets right in the foot.
These are like 7.62mm bullets right in the foot.

The funny thing is that as I was discussing it with my flatmate, he experienced the same thing, so we are both now avoiding those things as if they were grudges.

Maybe I just need to buy better shoes. Or just avoid those “mines” from now on. I really feel like an idiot at the moment.

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